Treating and Managing Glaucoma

Glaucoma can’t be cured, but it can be managed with proper treatment.1 Eye drops, oral medications and surgical procedures are all options for controlling glaucoma, slowing down the effects of the disease and preventing further vision loss.1

Diagnosing glaucoma

There are several tests that an ophthalmologist might use to diagnose glaucoma.2

  • Visual acuity test: Assesses the smallest letter you can read on a standardised chart.
  • Eye pressure test: Measures the pressure level in your eye.
  • Visual field test: Checks for any ‘missing’ areas in your vision.
  • Ophthalmoscopy: Examines the interior of the eye (using a special tool called an ophthalmoscope).
  • Gonioscopy: Examines the area where the fluid should drain out of your eye, to check if there is a blockage.
  • Optic nerve assessment: Determines if your optic nerve has been damaged.

Note: During the eye exam, you might be given eye drops to dilate (widen) your pupils, which gives the ophthalmologist a better view of your eyes.2

Treatments for glaucoma

Unfortunately, vision lost because of glaucoma cannot be restored, but treatment can slow it down or stop it from progressing further.1

Medications to reduce eye pressure

Eye drops: Prescription eye drops can help to lower eye pressure, either by improving fluid drainage or reducing the amount of fluid your eye produces.3

View our guide on how to take eye drops correctly here.

Oral medications: If eye drops alone don't lower your eye pressure enough, there are also prescription oral medications that can help.3 You might need to take just one medication or a combination of medications.1

Surgical procedures to reduce eye pressure:

Laser surgery: A procedure called laser trabeculoplasty (pronounced truh-bek-u-low-plas-tee) uses a small laser beam to stimulate the structure that drains fluid from the eye.1,3,4 This helps to improve fluid drainage and reduce pressure build-up.1,3,4

Conventional surgery (filtering surgery): A procedure called a trabeculectomy (pronounced truh-bek-u-lek-tuh-me) creates an opening or ‘drainage flap’ in the white part of the eye, to help fluid drain from your eye more efficiently.1,3,4

Drainage implant: A small silicone tube shunt is implanted into the eye to drain away excess fluid and lower the pressure levels.1,3,5 This is usually an option for cases of uncontrolled glaucoma or secondary glaucoma.1

Follow your treatment to preserve your vision

Following your treatment regimen properly is the only way to manage glaucoma and protect yourself against further vision loss.1,6 This means you need to take your medication/s in the right amounts and at the right times.6

Managing glaucoma is a lifelong process.1 It’s essential that you have regular eye exams, so your eye care professional can monitor your condition and adjust your treatment plan if needed.1

Discover some helpful tips for making your treatment easier here.

 

What is glaucoma?

What does glaucoma look like?

Am I at risk for glaucoma?

How is glaucoma managed?

Who is affected by glaucoma?

What you need know about PMB glaucoma?

Patient Resources

Home

What is glaucoma?

Am I at risk for glaucoma?

Who is affected by glaucoma?

Patient resources

What does glaucoma look like?

How is glaucoma managed?

What you need know about PMB glaucoma?

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