Am I at Risk for Glaucoma?

Glaucoma develops when the pressure inside your eye becomes too high, but the exact cause of the disease isn’t known.1

Some factors can make you more likely than someone else to develop glaucoma.1,2

Glaucoma risk factors

Age

Your risk of getting glaucoma increases as you get older.1-3

DID YOU KNOW? People older than 60 years are six times more likely to develop glaucoma.2

Genetics and family history

If someone in your immediate family has primary open-angle glaucoma, you have a higher risk of developing it too.1-3

DID YOU KNOW? Those with a family history of glaucoma are four to nine times more likely to develop glaucoma.2

Race

People of African descent have a higher risk of glaucoma than Caucasian people, and experience more severe vision loss too.1-3 People of Asian descent have a higher risk of angle-closure glaucoma.1-3

Gender

Research shows that women may be more likely than men to develop angle-closure glaucoma.3

Race

People of African descent have a higher risk of glaucoma than Caucasian people, and experience more severe vision loss too.1-3 People of Asian descent have a higher risk of angle-closure glaucoma.1-3

Gender

Research shows that women may be more likely than men to develop angle-closure glaucoma.3

IMPORTANT TO KNOW: What's the difference between primary open-angle glaucoma and angle-closure glaucoma? You can read more about the different types of glaucoma here.

Medical conditions

Some studies have linked certain health conditions to a higher risk of glaucoma, including:

  • Diabetes1,3
  • Hypertension (high blood pressure)1,3
  • Migraine3
  • Myopia (short-sightedness)3

Eye injuries

Trauma to the eye (such as a sports injury) can cause internal damage and increase pressure inside the eye.1,2 Sometimes glaucoma can develop years after the injury happened.1,2

Medications

Some types of medications (for example, steroid inhalers used to control asthma) can increase your risk of higher inner-eye pressure and glaucoma.1-3

Lifestyle factors

Research has shown that there may be a link between higher glaucoma risk and certain lifestyle factors, like smoking, obesity and lack of exercise.3,4

Who is affected by glaucoma?

As the world’s population grows older, the prevalence of glaucoma is also growing.5 By 2040, it’s expected that approximately 111.8 million people around the world will be affected by glaucoma.5

Early detection is essential - get tested

There is no cure for glaucoma, but the disease can be managed with the right treatment.1 Early detection and treatment can help to prevent unnecessary vision loss.1

Protect your sight – make an appointment with an eye care professional for a complete eye health exam (including eye dilation) to check for glaucoma.2

What is glaucoma?

What does glaucoma look like?

Am I at risk for glaucoma?

How is glaucoma managed?

Who is affectd by glaucoma?

What you need to know about PMB in glaucoma?

Patient Resources

Home

What is glaucoma?

Am I at risk for glaucoma?

Who is affected by glaucoma?

Patient resources

What does glaucoma look like?

How is glaucoma managed?

What you need know about PMB glaucoma?

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